What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

We all share a common issue: no bees = no life. Save the Bees Australia aims to empower others to create change in their world. Bees and humanity face a major challenge from insecticides, herbicides, industrial-scale monoculture food farming and habitat fragmentation. Together we can tackle these issues and Save the Bees.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like-minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face. We are passionate advocates and educators who work with the community to change policy and personal action to support bee populations. Save the Bees Australia evolved from saving and rehousing problematic bee infestations to a social enterprise advocating for organic farming, nutrition, pollution, environment, education, wisdom, permaculture and love.

How you can Help

Donate

Your support allows us to keep Save the Bees Australia generating change. Please call us if you have any questions about your contribution. How do donations help?

Sign the Petition

Sign our petition to have imported honey labeled with country of origin. Help prevent corporations from confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products.

Personal Action

Learn how you can create a bee-friendly home and support bee-friendly practices.

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

Bees are at their most vulnerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming involves the oldest and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

17 hours ago

Saving native bees in Sydney - with Costa & Dan ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

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4 days ago

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Buy Beer. Save Bees. Sparkke Change.

Introducing our newest partnership - The Sparkke Change Beverage Company x Save the Bees!

Sparkke is a female founded and led alcohol company making 100% natural beers and other bee friendly brews. Yup! No preservatives, no sulphurs and 100% no bullshit (with some vegan and gluten free bevvies too!) They use their platform to raise awareness and funds for socially-conscious organisations - to, well, #SparkkeChange.

Earlier this year, as unprecedented bushfire emergencies wiped out tens of thousands of commercial and native Bee hives, Sparkke released a Black IPA called ‘To Bee Or Not To Bee’ to raise awareness about the importance of Bees and their increasing vulnerability.

Save the Bees have partnered with Sparkke who will donate 65% of the profit from each sale from their website to continue Saving the Bees. Here's how it works - every $10 spent through the Sparkke store helps us save 300 Bees. The bigger math is pretty simple – spend $100 through Sparkke, and you’re helping us save 3000 Bees.

All up, they're aiming to help us rescue and relocate 6 million Bees before the end of summer. Check them out and let's save the Bees all while having a delicious Sparkke brew in hand.

bit.ly/sparkkesavethebees

#Bees #beehive #tobeeornottobee #savetheBees #pollinate #pollinators #pollen #sparkkechange #babeswhobrew #supportlocal #honeyBees #Beeswax #Beesofinstagram #womenwhobrew #sustainability #natural beers #sparkke #beerbeautifulbeer #bloom #spring #flowers #apiculture #bringbacktheBees #nativeBees #backyardBees #Beesweet #queenBees #ignitethegood
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

7 days ago

Wastewater from fracking contains toxic chemicals used in fracking fluid, as well as natural contaminants from deep underground, including total dissolved solids (e.g., salts, barium, strontium), organic pollutants (e.g., benzene, toluene) and normally occurring radioactive material (NORM) such as Radium 226. An estimated 30% to 70% of the fluid used in fracking will resurface, requiring treatment. Fracking also releases "produced water" from underground that also rises to the surface, and can be anywhere from two to 200 times as much water, depending on the oil/gas/water concentrations in the shale formation. This water is toxic to life. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Gusanos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Buy organic sunflower seeds here.

www.beethecure.com.au/product/save-the-bees-australia-x-murals-for-change-sunflower-seeds/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Goldie has some new bees. Every year a colony arrives from a derelict house next door.
Over the next few weeks Goldie with give us some tips on home growing vegetables.

#savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

Is this how some fake supermarket is made? ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

@thehogholder Blue banded bee gets the pollen by banging its head on the flower's anthers at a staggering 350 times a second. Blue banded bees can sting but are not as aggressive as other bees. The males cling to plant stems during the night. They are solitary creatures, with single females inhabiting burrows in the soil or soft stone. Unlike social species such as honey bees which live in large colonies blue banded bees live in small colonies . Blue banded bees are capable of buzz pollination. Most flowers release their pollen passively, but others like the tomato flowers only release their pollen when the flower is vibrated rapidly – ‘buzz-pollination’. Bees capable of buzz-pollinating clamp their legs onto the another cone of the flower and contract their flight muscles so vigorously that there pollen is released. #savethebees ... See MoreSee Less

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Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals. 

Save

17 hours ago

Saving native bees in Sydney - with Costa & Dan ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

View on Facebook

4 days ago

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Buy Beer. Save Bees. Sparkke Change.

Introducing our newest partnership - The Sparkke Change Beverage Company x Save the Bees!

Sparkke is a female founded and led alcohol company making 100% natural beers and other bee friendly brews. Yup! No preservatives, no sulphurs and 100% no bullshit (with some vegan and gluten free bevvies too!) They use their platform to raise awareness and funds for socially-conscious organisations - to, well, #SparkkeChange.

Earlier this year, as unprecedented bushfire emergencies wiped out tens of thousands of commercial and native Bee hives, Sparkke released a Black IPA called ‘To Bee Or Not To Bee’ to raise awareness about the importance of Bees and their increasing vulnerability.

Save the Bees have partnered with Sparkke who will donate 65% of the profit from each sale from their website to continue Saving the Bees. Here's how it works - every $10 spent through the Sparkke store helps us save 300 Bees. The bigger math is pretty simple – spend $100 through Sparkke, and you’re helping us save 3000 Bees.

All up, they're aiming to help us rescue and relocate 6 million Bees before the end of summer. Check them out and let's save the Bees all while having a delicious Sparkke brew in hand.

bit.ly/sparkkesavethebees

#Bees #beehive #tobeeornottobee #savetheBees #pollinate #pollinators #pollen #sparkkechange #babeswhobrew #supportlocal #honeyBees #Beeswax #Beesofinstagram #womenwhobrew #sustainability #natural beers #sparkke #beerbeautifulbeer #bloom #spring #flowers #apiculture #bringbacktheBees #nativeBees #backyardBees #Beesweet #queenBees #ignitethegood
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

7 days ago

Wastewater from fracking contains toxic chemicals used in fracking fluid, as well as natural contaminants from deep underground, including total dissolved solids (e.g., salts, barium, strontium), organic pollutants (e.g., benzene, toluene) and normally occurring radioactive material (NORM) such as Radium 226. An estimated 30% to 70% of the fluid used in fracking will resurface, requiring treatment. Fracking also releases "produced water" from underground that also rises to the surface, and can be anywhere from two to 200 times as much water, depending on the oil/gas/water concentrations in the shale formation. This water is toxic to life. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Gusanos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Buy organic sunflower seeds here.

www.beethecure.com.au/product/save-the-bees-australia-x-murals-for-change-sunflower-seeds/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Goldie has some new bees. Every year a colony arrives from a derelict house next door.
Over the next few weeks Goldie with give us some tips on home growing vegetables.

#savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

Is this how some fake supermarket is made? ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

@thehogholder Blue banded bee gets the pollen by banging its head on the flower's anthers at a staggering 350 times a second. Blue banded bees can sting but are not as aggressive as other bees. The males cling to plant stems during the night. They are solitary creatures, with single females inhabiting burrows in the soil or soft stone. Unlike social species such as honey bees which live in large colonies blue banded bees live in small colonies . Blue banded bees are capable of buzz pollination. Most flowers release their pollen passively, but others like the tomato flowers only release their pollen when the flower is vibrated rapidly – ‘buzz-pollination’. Bees capable of buzz-pollinating clamp their legs onto the another cone of the flower and contract their flight muscles so vigorously that there pollen is released. #savethebees ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

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