What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

All of us share this issue:  no bees = no life. I want to empower others to know they can make a difference. Products like “Round Up” weed killer and “Confidor” insecticides have been proven to harm bees. Glyphosate – the active ingredient in Round Up – has been banned in several countries for being carcinogenic.  Bees and humanity face a major challenge as massive corporations are determined to feed the world with GMO (genetically modified) Food mono culture farming.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia has evolved from saving problem bee infestations and re housing bees into a social enterprise. Bees encompass so many issues organic farming , nutrition , pollution , environment , education, wisdom, permaculture and love.  Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face.

How you can Help

Donate to Bee the Cure

Your support would mean a lot to us, If you have any questions please called us  0400 882 146. Donate Now

Sign the Petition

Corporations are confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products. Sign our petition to have imported honey labelled with country of origin.

 

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Bees are at their most venerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming Involves older and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location. Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

16 hours ago

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Save the Bees Australia shared a photo.
Save the Bees Australia

1 day ago

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2 days ago

Please continue to donate there are more beekeepers that need assistance because of fires and floods.

www.beethecure.com.au/emergency-fundraiser/
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2 days ago

We’re pleased to announce our partnership with Sydney Sock Project , a organisation that uses socks to help raise funds and awareness to effective non for profit organisations. For every pair of our Bee Sock purchased, a donation will be made to this @savethebeesaustralia 🧦 Use discount code SAVETHEBEES and receive 10% off your first order 🐝 Shop link in bio ⬆️
Swipe to find out what you can do to help #savethebees.

sydneysockproject.com/products/bee-sock
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2 days ago

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3 days ago

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4 days ago

The production of #beeswax is essential to the bee colony. It is used to construct the combs in which the bees raise their brood and into which they store #pollen and surplus #honey for the winter.

Worker bees, which live only around 35 days in the summer, develop special wax-producing glands on their abdomens (inner sides of the sternites of abdominal segments 4 to 7) and are most efficient at wax production during the 10th through the 16th days of their lives. From about day 18 until the end of its life, a bee's wax glands steadily decline. Bees consume honey (3kg of honey are consumed to produce 1kg of wax) causing the special wax-producing glands to covert the sugar into wax which is extruded through small pores. The wax appears as small flakes on the bees' abdomen. At this point the flakes are essentially transparent and only become white after being chewed. It is in the mastication process that salivary secretions are added to the wax to help soften it. This also accounts for its change in color.

The exact process of how a bee transfers the wax scales from its abdomen to its mandibles was a mystery for years. It's now understood to be processed in either of two ways. Most of the activities in the hive are cooperative so it should be no surprise that other worker bees are willing to remove the wax scales from their neighbors and then chew them. The other method is for the same bee extruding the wax to process her own wax scales. This is done using one hind leg to move a wax scale to the first pair of legs (forelegs). A foreleg then makes the final transfer to the mandibles where it is masticated, and then applied to the comb being constructed or repaired. However, honeybees maintain their hive at a temperature of around 34 degrees , which is perfect for the manipulation of beeswax. It has also been shown to be one of the strongest possible shapes while using the least amount of material.

Photo via www.facebook.com/104192689741419/posts/1455994731227868/?d=n
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Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals.

Honey Map

Save

 

16 hours ago

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia shared a photo.
Save the Bees Australia

1 day ago

Timeline Photos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Please continue to donate there are more beekeepers that need assistance because of fires and floods.

www.beethecure.com.au/emergency-fundraiser/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

We’re pleased to announce our partnership with Sydney Sock Project , a organisation that uses socks to help raise funds and awareness to effective non for profit organisations. For every pair of our Bee Sock purchased, a donation will be made to this @savethebeesaustralia 🧦 Use discount code SAVETHEBEES and receive 10% off your first order 🐝 Shop link in bio ⬆️
Swipe to find out what you can do to help #savethebees.

sydneysockproject.com/products/bee-sock
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

View on Facebook

3 days ago

View on Facebook

4 days ago

The production of #beeswax is essential to the bee colony. It is used to construct the combs in which the bees raise their brood and into which they store #pollen and surplus #honey for the winter.

Worker bees, which live only around 35 days in the summer, develop special wax-producing glands on their abdomens (inner sides of the sternites of abdominal segments 4 to 7) and are most efficient at wax production during the 10th through the 16th days of their lives. From about day 18 until the end of its life, a bee's wax glands steadily decline. Bees consume honey (3kg of honey are consumed to produce 1kg of wax) causing the special wax-producing glands to covert the sugar into wax which is extruded through small pores. The wax appears as small flakes on the bees' abdomen. At this point the flakes are essentially transparent and only become white after being chewed. It is in the mastication process that salivary secretions are added to the wax to help soften it. This also accounts for its change in color.

The exact process of how a bee transfers the wax scales from its abdomen to its mandibles was a mystery for years. It's now understood to be processed in either of two ways. Most of the activities in the hive are cooperative so it should be no surprise that other worker bees are willing to remove the wax scales from their neighbors and then chew them. The other method is for the same bee extruding the wax to process her own wax scales. This is done using one hind leg to move a wax scale to the first pair of legs (forelegs). A foreleg then makes the final transfer to the mandibles where it is masticated, and then applied to the comb being constructed or repaired. However, honeybees maintain their hive at a temperature of around 34 degrees , which is perfect for the manipulation of beeswax. It has also been shown to be one of the strongest possible shapes while using the least amount of material.

Photo via www.facebook.com/104192689741419/posts/1455994731227868/?d=n
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook