What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Beekeeping 101 Course

Our online beekeeping course has just launched!

Become a beekeeper to Bee the Cure!

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Our Story

We all share a common issue: no bees = no life. Save the Bees Australia aims to empower others to create change in their world. Bees and humanity face a major challenge from insecticides, herbicides, industrial-scale monoculture food farming and habitat fragmentation. Together we can tackle these issues and Save the Bees.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like-minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face. We are passionate advocates and educators who work with the community to change policy and personal action to support bee populations. Save the Bees Australia evolved from saving and rehousing problematic bee infestations to a social enterprise advocating for organic farming, nutrition, pollution, environment, education, wisdom, permaculture and love.

How you can Help

Donate

Your support allows us to keep Save the Bees Australia generating change. Please call us if you have any questions about your contribution. How do donations help?

Sign the Petition

Sign our petition to have imported honey labeled with country of origin. Help prevent corporations from confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products.

Personal Action

Learn how you can create a bee-friendly home and support bee-friendly practices.

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

Bees are at their most vulnerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming involves the oldest and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

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2 days ago

“The way to save native pollinators is to adopt approaches that can save all insects. Including honey bees. Bee enthusiasts and bee keepers ought be allies, and we need to be acting as such. We need to focus on real and practical solutions that can protect habitat, rather than bickering which species get to stay on an ever shrinking life boat. We are suffering such dire circumstances, this is not the time to fight over what bees are good or which ones are “bad”.If honey bees weren’t in the picture, that native bees…well, the native bees would probably be in exactly the same state as they are right now or even worse. The popularity of beekeeping is creating an ever increasing army that has an intimate relationships with nature and willfight to protecting her. Native bees are insects, and the planet is losing all insects at an alarming rate. At the current extinction rates, most life on Earth will be gone in around 60 years; about the same time that most of the planet’s topsoil will be gone. And this species loss isn’t because of the honey bees. Our food system is at the crux of this problem. It can be the source of species loss, or the solution to species loss. Food production is a destructive process. At its least, agriculture replaces life from a habitat with life that we choose. This can be done well. Or this can be done poorly. Right now, it is often done poorly. Industrialized agriculture removes plant diversity from the landscape at unprecedented scales. It replaces it with a monoculture of a single crop or livestock species. The natural resource base is destroyed, along with all the ecosystem functions that drove the productivity of this habitat. Agrichemicals are then used to restore some of this habitat’s productivity. But these chemicals remove additional life from the farm, forcing the need for additional reliance on agrichemicals. And so cranks the treadmill. “The solution is beautiful small scale localised farming can feed the world. ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Sunflower Socks 🌻 ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Happy Mother’s Day. The #queen bee really does know what hard work is. In her life of six to nine years she produces about one egg each minute. That works out to laying her own body weight in eggs each day. There is one queen who is the only fertile female in the hive. She is the only bee with ovaries. Second, there are about 60,000 sterile female #workers, that do not have ovaries. From birth to about day three, they clean the hive. By the fifth day of their life, they become nursing bees because certain glands have matured inside their mouths. By day 12, their wax-making glands are functioning, so they set to making structures in the nest and storing nectar and honey. Around the 19th day of their life they begin guarding the nest with their sting. By day 21, they are halfway through their short lives and have begun to leave the nest to forage for nectar and #pollen. And then around day 42 they usually die. #Drones make up the third gender. They don’t have a stinger, and they can’t collect nectar. They are fertile and can make sperm. The queen will mate once in her life with dozens of these drones who die after copulation. www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2013/04/10/3733766.htm#savethebees #beethecure ... See MoreSee Less
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Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals.

Save

1 day ago

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2 days ago

“The way to save native pollinators is to adopt approaches that can save all insects. Including honey bees. Bee enthusiasts and bee keepers ought be allies, and we need to be acting as such. We need to focus on real and practical solutions that can protect habitat, rather than bickering which species get to stay on an ever shrinking life boat. We are suffering such dire circumstances, this is not the time to fight over what bees are good or which ones are “bad”.If honey bees weren’t in the picture, that native bees…well, the native bees would probably be in exactly the same state as they are right now or even worse. The popularity of beekeeping is creating an ever increasing army that has an intimate relationships with nature and willfight to protecting her. Native bees are insects, and the planet is losing all insects at an alarming rate. At the current extinction rates, most life on Earth will be gone in around 60 years; about the same time that most of the planet’s topsoil will be gone. And this species loss isn’t because of the honey bees. Our food system is at the crux of this problem. It can be the source of species loss, or the solution to species loss. Food production is a destructive process. At its least, agriculture replaces life from a habitat with life that we choose. This can be done well. Or this can be done poorly. Right now, it is often done poorly. Industrialized agriculture removes plant diversity from the landscape at unprecedented scales. It replaces it with a monoculture of a single crop or livestock species. The natural resource base is destroyed, along with all the ecosystem functions that drove the productivity of this habitat. Agrichemicals are then used to restore some of this habitat’s productivity. But these chemicals remove additional life from the farm, forcing the need for additional reliance on agrichemicals. And so cranks the treadmill. “The solution is beautiful small scale localised farming can feed the world. ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

1 week ago

View on Facebook

1 week ago

View on Facebook

1 week ago

Sunflower Socks 🌻 ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

1 week ago

Happy Mother’s Day. The #queen bee really does know what hard work is. In her life of six to nine years she produces about one egg each minute. That works out to laying her own body weight in eggs each day. There is one queen who is the only fertile female in the hive. She is the only bee with ovaries. Second, there are about 60,000 sterile female #workers, that do not have ovaries. From birth to about day three, they clean the hive. By the fifth day of their life, they become nursing bees because certain glands have matured inside their mouths. By day 12, their wax-making glands are functioning, so they set to making structures in the nest and storing nectar and honey. Around the 19th day of their life they begin guarding the nest with their sting. By day 21, they are halfway through their short lives and have begun to leave the nest to forage for nectar and #pollen. And then around day 42 they usually die. #Drones make up the third gender. They don’t have a stinger, and they can’t collect nectar. They are fertile and can make sperm. The queen will mate once in her life with dozens of these drones who die after copulation. www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2013/04/10/3733766.htm#savethebees #beethecure ... See MoreSee Less
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