What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

We all share a common issue: no bees = no life. Save the Bees Australia aims to empower others to create change in their world. Bees and humanity face a major challenge from insecticides, herbicides, industrial-scale monoculture food farming and habitat fragmentation. Together we can tackle these issues and Save the Bees.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like-minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face. We are passionate advocates and educators who work with the community to change policy and personal action to support bee populations. Save the Bees Australia evolved from saving and rehousing problematic bee infestations to a social enterprise advocating for organic farming, nutrition, pollution, environment, education, wisdom, permaculture and love.

How you can Help

Donate

Your support allows us to keep Save the Bees Australia generating change. Please call us if you have any questions about your contribution. How do donations help?

Sign the Petition

Sign our petition to have imported honey labeled with country of origin. Help prevent corporations from confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products.

Personal Action

Learn how you can create a bee-friendly home and support bee-friendly practices.

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

Bees are at their most vulnerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming involves the oldest and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

20 hours ago

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21 hours ago

Why Hexagons?
“The geometry of this shape uses the least amount of material to hold the most weight"
It takes the bees quite a bit of work to make the honeycomb. The wax comes from glands on the bees’ bellies, or abdomens. Honeybees have to make and eat honey to make wax. Then they can add this wax to the comb as they build. A bee colony must produce honey to create the structure it is also important to hold all this weight and protect the honey, especially during winter.
The hexagon saves bees some time and energy.
Not too long ago, some scientists wondered how exactly how the bees build these hexagons. They found certain bees would start out making circles in the wax using their body as a tool. Scientists don’t really know why it happens, but the bees seem to be able the resonate a warm frequency using their body heat to melt the wax from a circle shape into a hexagon shape.
Humanity has learned from the bee. Hexagons apply to almost everything we build. Including bridges , airplanes and cars. The shape gives materials extra strength.
Materials made with hexagon can also handle a lot of force, even if they are made out of a lighter material.
After 100 million years of adaptation bees have a superior knowledge of mathematics and geometry. Bees are the best teachers. Everything is connected. #savethebees #beethecure
... See MoreSee Less

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1 day ago

Tell us why you love bees for your chance to win a free ticket to #mayathebee ... See MoreSee Less

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Save the Bees Australia with The Sparkke Change Beverage Company.
Save the Bees Australia

2 days ago

It sold out in a flash last time, but our Honey Malt Liqueur collab with @sparkkechange is back baby! 🍯⁠

Hand filled, labelled and numbered, this sweet spirit makes the perfect after-dinner digestif.⁠

The Honey Malt Liqueur (700mL 20%) is like a modern Drambuie for the Rusty Nail connoisseur. Enriched with botanicals of orange peel, cinnamon and vanilla bean with woody French oak notes, our liqueur is distilled from Sparkke’s 100% natural, award-winning Pale Ale and Ginger Beer. Infused with local organic honey from our maker’s own honeybee hive with a small amount of propolis harvested from the hive and famous for its healing properties.⁠

Link in bio to get your hands on this delicious, limited edition & all natural spirit!

sparkke.com/products/honey-malt-liqueur
... See MoreSee Less

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2 days ago

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4 days ago

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Europe Union has banned neonicotinoids and Australia must follow. Not only are honeybee under threat but also our 1500 indigenous bee species including the bluebanded bee.
Neonicotinoids insecticides are currently registered for use in Australia on a range of pests and crops by farmers, growers and home gardeners. Neonicotinoids are systemic nerve poisons and kill insects on contact or ingestion. Exposure to sub-lethal doses causes behavioural disturbances and disorientation, which is ultimately fatal for beehives. If these chemicals are killing bees inevitably they will kill us. With any understanding of economics we ought to realise how crucial bees are to the economy and our food system. The European Union has banned the world’s most widely used insecticides from all fields due to the serious danger they pose to bees. Australian regulators must do whatever they can to protect bees as they provide an irreplaceable pollination role in our food production. There is not an issue with feeding the worlds population if we concentrate on small scale localised farming . More employment opportunities, greater nutrition and quality food. Using poison on food is malignant.
#Bayer #Monsanto and Syngenta has huge lobbying capabilities. Killing bees suits them because than they can control the food and make greater profits.
Please sign and share this petition Life as we know it depends on it.

Www.change.org/banneonicotinoids

Photo @redsky_night
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

@marnieleeo 🐝 🌳 “We need to plant trees for the bees” 🌳🐝

Today’s little lesson about our planet brought to you by Matisse!
#savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

View on Facebook

Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals. 

Save

20 hours ago

View on Facebook

21 hours ago

Why Hexagons?
“The geometry of this shape uses the least amount of material to hold the most weight"
It takes the bees quite a bit of work to make the honeycomb. The wax comes from glands on the bees’ bellies, or abdomens. Honeybees have to make and eat honey to make wax. Then they can add this wax to the comb as they build. A bee colony must produce honey to create the structure it is also important to hold all this weight and protect the honey, especially during winter.
The hexagon saves bees some time and energy.
Not too long ago, some scientists wondered how exactly how the bees build these hexagons. They found certain bees would start out making circles in the wax using their body as a tool. Scientists don’t really know why it happens, but the bees seem to be able the resonate a warm frequency using their body heat to melt the wax from a circle shape into a hexagon shape.
Humanity has learned from the bee. Hexagons apply to almost everything we build. Including bridges , airplanes and cars. The shape gives materials extra strength.
Materials made with hexagon can also handle a lot of force, even if they are made out of a lighter material.
After 100 million years of adaptation bees have a superior knowledge of mathematics and geometry. Bees are the best teachers. Everything is connected. #savethebees #beethecure
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 day ago

Tell us why you love bees for your chance to win a free ticket to #mayathebee ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia with The Sparkke Change Beverage Company.
Save the Bees Australia

2 days ago

It sold out in a flash last time, but our Honey Malt Liqueur collab with @sparkkechange is back baby! 🍯⁠

Hand filled, labelled and numbered, this sweet spirit makes the perfect after-dinner digestif.⁠

The Honey Malt Liqueur (700mL 20%) is like a modern Drambuie for the Rusty Nail connoisseur. Enriched with botanicals of orange peel, cinnamon and vanilla bean with woody French oak notes, our liqueur is distilled from Sparkke’s 100% natural, award-winning Pale Ale and Ginger Beer. Infused with local organic honey from our maker’s own honeybee hive with a small amount of propolis harvested from the hive and famous for its healing properties.⁠

Link in bio to get your hands on this delicious, limited edition & all natural spirit!

sparkke.com/products/honey-malt-liqueur
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

View on Facebook

4 days ago

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Europe Union has banned neonicotinoids and Australia must follow. Not only are honeybee under threat but also our 1500 indigenous bee species including the bluebanded bee.
Neonicotinoids insecticides are currently registered for use in Australia on a range of pests and crops by farmers, growers and home gardeners. Neonicotinoids are systemic nerve poisons and kill insects on contact or ingestion. Exposure to sub-lethal doses causes behavioural disturbances and disorientation, which is ultimately fatal for beehives. If these chemicals are killing bees inevitably they will kill us. With any understanding of economics we ought to realise how crucial bees are to the economy and our food system. The European Union has banned the world’s most widely used insecticides from all fields due to the serious danger they pose to bees. Australian regulators must do whatever they can to protect bees as they provide an irreplaceable pollination role in our food production. There is not an issue with feeding the worlds population if we concentrate on small scale localised farming . More employment opportunities, greater nutrition and quality food. Using poison on food is malignant.
#Bayer #Monsanto and Syngenta has huge lobbying capabilities. Killing bees suits them because than they can control the food and make greater profits.
Please sign and share this petition Life as we know it depends on it.

Www.change.org/banneonicotinoids

Photo @redsky_night
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

@marnieleeo 🐝 🌳 “We need to plant trees for the bees” 🌳🐝

Today’s little lesson about our planet brought to you by Matisse!
#savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 weeks ago

View on Facebook

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