What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

All of us share this issue:  no bees = no life. I want to empower others to know they can make a difference. Products like “Round Up” weed killer and “Confidor” insecticides have been proven to harm bees. Glyphosate – the active ingredient in Round Up – has been banned in several countries for being carcinogenic.  Bees and humanity face a major challenge as massive corporations are determined to feed the world with GMO (genetically modified) Food mono culture farming.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia has evolved from saving problem bee infestations and re housing bees into a social enterprise. Bees encompass so many issues organic farming , nutrition , pollution , environment , education, wisdom, permaculture and love.  Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face.

How you can Help

Donate to Bee the Cure

Your support would mean a lot to us, If you have any questions please called us  0400 882 146. Donate Now

Sign the Petition

Corporations are confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products. Sign our petition to have imported honey labelled with country of origin.

 

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Bees are at their most venerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming Involves older and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location. Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

Save the Bees Australia updated their cover photo.
Save the Bees Australia

7 hours ago

Save the bees Australia founder Simon Mulvany has received an apology from Department of Human Services Victoria chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton for the controversial mosquito spray.

Mr Mulvany said if the spraying blitz had gone ahead on a bigger scale there would have been no local honey on the Peninsula.

He said Dr Sutton conceded the spraying, a bid to eradicate mozzies possibly carrying the harmful Buruli virus, shouldn’t have taken place. Four Rye streets were sprayed earlier this year as a test but the wider plan, which was set to take place in October, was cancelled amid fears about the harmful effects of the chemicals.

“There’s simply not enough information to say mosquitoes are a vector for the ulcer,” Mr Mulvany said.

He said the Buruli ulcer had decreased on the Peninsula.

“If they had gone through with the spraying, they probably would have been able to form some correlation,” he said.

“They were planning to spray an astronomical area between Portsea and St Andrews, (but) the harmful effects of these chemicals had not been properly communicated.”

Mr Mulvany said the impact on local bee populations, particularly indigenous bees, as well as honey for consumption and medicinal purposes would have been “devastating”.

“Every insect would be affected; tadpoles, frogs and even the insects that kill mosquitoes. The issues arising from the spraying could have been bigger than the ulcer.”

Mr Mulvany said with the “global bee crisis” it had never been more important for bees to live in urban environments.

Dr Sutton said his team was still working to stop the Buruli ulcer.

“I know the research team went about their activity with the best of intentions — they wanted to protect public health and get to the bottom of how Buruli is being transmitted,” he said.

“Going forward, we will make sure liaison happens with the community in the best way possible, with a portal for raising concerns and getting information.” Via Journalist Sally Heppleston

Full article below.

www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/south-east/save-the-bees-australia-founder-says-controversial-mosquit...

Or

leader.smedia.com.au/mornington-peninsula/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

23 hours ago

Save the bees Australia founder Simon Mulvany has received an apology from Department of Human Services Victoria chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton for the controversial mosquito spray.

Mr Mulvany said if the spraying blitz had gone ahead on a bigger scale there would have been no local honey on the Peninsula.

He said Dr Sutton conceded the spraying, a bid to eradicate mozzies possibly carrying the harmful Buruli virus, shouldn’t have taken place. Four Rye streets were sprayed earlier this year as a test but the wider plan, which was set to take place in October, was cancelled amid fears about the harmful effects of the chemicals.

“There’s simply not enough information to say mosquitoes are a vector for the ulcer,” Mr Mulvany said.

He said the Buruli ulcer had decreased on the Peninsula.

“If they had gone through with the spraying, they probably would have been able to form some correlation,” he said.

“They were planning to spray an astronomical area between Portsea and St Andrews, (but) the harmful effects of these chemicals had not been properly communicated.”

Mr Mulvany said the impact on local bee populations, particularly indigenous bees, as well as honey for consumption and medicinal purposes would have been “devastating”.

“Every insect would be affected; tadpoles, frogs and even the insects that kill mosquitoes. The issues arising from the spraying could have been bigger than the ulcer.”

Mr Mulvany said with the “global bee crisis” it had never been more important for bees to live in urban environments.

Dr Sutton said his team was still working to stop the Buruli ulcer.

“I know the research team went about their activity with the best of intentions — they wanted to protect public health and get to the bottom of how Buruli is being transmitted,” he said.

“Going forward, we will make sure liaison happens with the community in the best way possible, with a portal for raising concerns and getting information.” Via Journalist Sally Heppleston

Full article below.

www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/south-east/save-the-bees-australia-founder-says-controversial-mosquit...

Or

leader.smedia.com.au/mornington-peninsula/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

One way to help Save the bees is to learn about them. Pollinator Alliance has a great new Bee School based in Melbourne where you can learn more about bees and beekeeping. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

www.facebook.com/329133007190930/posts/2334308423340035?sfns=mo ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia shared a photo.
Save the Bees Australia

3 days ago

Instagram Photos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

www.facebook.com/329133007190930/posts/2329500957154115?sfns=mo ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Bees survive #bushfires. #beekeepers know the response of honeybees to smoke is to retreat and gorge on honey which tends to make them less inclined to sting, coupled with the masking of their alarm pheromone this is a godsend as it enables beekeepers to tend to their apiaries. This innate behaviour demonstrates bees have evolved through a fire-prone ecology.

The perception that honeybees can escape an approaching wildfire by gorging on honey than absconding in advance is an utter fallacy. Preparing to abscond or swarm takes planning, a laying queen is too heavy to fly and honey bees rarely abscond if brood is present. Thus for a swarm to depart from a hive takes preparation in advance – workers will stop feeding a queen before the anticipated swarm date and the queen will stop laying eggs. This is impossible with the sudden arrival of a fire.
After a devastating wildfire in the Table Mountain South Africa an analysis of the 17 natural nests within the fire zone supplied an explanation. Most colony's unexpectedly survived 68% had their openings entirely enclosed in propolis with small openings within this propolis wall serving as fire wall at entrances to the nest.
This is when the stored honey is essential to tide them over this dearth period which is about 2 to 3 weeks long before the fire-loving ephemerals sprout from underground bulbs or rhizomes and flower in profusion, having been relieved of competition from other plants.
The colonies are able to survive wild fires, another example of the incredible genius which exists in nature. //www.naturalbeekeepingtrust.org #savethebees #beethecure
... See MoreSee Less

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6 days ago

Www.change.org/banneonicotinoids ... See MoreSee Less

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7 days ago

News Release

Wednesday 6 November 2019

All State forests closed between Sydney and Queensland border

All State forests from the north of Sydney to the Queensland border and the northern tablelands will be closed to the public on Thursday 7, Friday 8 and Saturday 9 November due to the very high to extreme fire danger over the coming days.

The closure applies to all State forests in the following Rural Fire Service zones:

• Greater Sydney Region

• Far North Coast

• North Coast

• Greater Hunter

New England

• Northern Slopes.

The only exceptions are Cumberland State Forest, Treetops Adventure Park at Ourimbah State

Forest and Sealy Lookout at Orara East State Forest.

Forestry Corporation of NSW's Senior Manager Forest Stewardship Kathy Lyons asked the community to stay out of these State forests due to the very high risk to public safety.

"We are expecting very high to severe and extreme fire weather over the next three days and there are already extensive fires across the north coast and tablelands. Fires are likely to be uncontrollable in these conditions," Ms Lyons said.

"All State forests from the north of Sydney to the Queensland border and the northern tablelands will be closed for the next three days due to the high fire danger.

"This closure will affect popular camp grounds and picnic areas throughout the region including

Olney, Heaton and Strickland State forests. Swans Crossing near Kendall, Coopernook Headquarters and recreation areas along the Allyn River and Telegherry River in the Chichester State forest.

"Please do not enter these forests over the next three days."

For the latest information about fires, visit the Rural Fire Service website www.rfs.nsw.gov.au

Media Contact: Elizabeth Fowler 0408 779 903 / Joanna Bodley 0427 939 543
... See MoreSee Less

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Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals.

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Save

 

Save the Bees Australia updated their cover photo.
Save the Bees Australia

7 hours ago

Save the bees Australia founder Simon Mulvany has received an apology from Department of Human Services Victoria chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton for the controversial mosquito spray.

Mr Mulvany said if the spraying blitz had gone ahead on a bigger scale there would have been no local honey on the Peninsula.

He said Dr Sutton conceded the spraying, a bid to eradicate mozzies possibly carrying the harmful Buruli virus, shouldn’t have taken place. Four Rye streets were sprayed earlier this year as a test but the wider plan, which was set to take place in October, was cancelled amid fears about the harmful effects of the chemicals.

“There’s simply not enough information to say mosquitoes are a vector for the ulcer,” Mr Mulvany said.

He said the Buruli ulcer had decreased on the Peninsula.

“If they had gone through with the spraying, they probably would have been able to form some correlation,” he said.

“They were planning to spray an astronomical area between Portsea and St Andrews, (but) the harmful effects of these chemicals had not been properly communicated.”

Mr Mulvany said the impact on local bee populations, particularly indigenous bees, as well as honey for consumption and medicinal purposes would have been “devastating”.

“Every insect would be affected; tadpoles, frogs and even the insects that kill mosquitoes. The issues arising from the spraying could have been bigger than the ulcer.”

Mr Mulvany said with the “global bee crisis” it had never been more important for bees to live in urban environments.

Dr Sutton said his team was still working to stop the Buruli ulcer.

“I know the research team went about their activity with the best of intentions — they wanted to protect public health and get to the bottom of how Buruli is being transmitted,” he said.

“Going forward, we will make sure liaison happens with the community in the best way possible, with a portal for raising concerns and getting information.” Via Journalist Sally Heppleston

Full article below.

www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/south-east/save-the-bees-australia-founder-says-controversial-mosquit...

Or

leader.smedia.com.au/mornington-peninsula/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

23 hours ago

Save the bees Australia founder Simon Mulvany has received an apology from Department of Human Services Victoria chief health officer Dr Brett Sutton for the controversial mosquito spray.

Mr Mulvany said if the spraying blitz had gone ahead on a bigger scale there would have been no local honey on the Peninsula.

He said Dr Sutton conceded the spraying, a bid to eradicate mozzies possibly carrying the harmful Buruli virus, shouldn’t have taken place. Four Rye streets were sprayed earlier this year as a test but the wider plan, which was set to take place in October, was cancelled amid fears about the harmful effects of the chemicals.

“There’s simply not enough information to say mosquitoes are a vector for the ulcer,” Mr Mulvany said.

He said the Buruli ulcer had decreased on the Peninsula.

“If they had gone through with the spraying, they probably would have been able to form some correlation,” he said.

“They were planning to spray an astronomical area between Portsea and St Andrews, (but) the harmful effects of these chemicals had not been properly communicated.”

Mr Mulvany said the impact on local bee populations, particularly indigenous bees, as well as honey for consumption and medicinal purposes would have been “devastating”.

“Every insect would be affected; tadpoles, frogs and even the insects that kill mosquitoes. The issues arising from the spraying could have been bigger than the ulcer.”

Mr Mulvany said with the “global bee crisis” it had never been more important for bees to live in urban environments.

Dr Sutton said his team was still working to stop the Buruli ulcer.

“I know the research team went about their activity with the best of intentions — they wanted to protect public health and get to the bottom of how Buruli is being transmitted,” he said.

“Going forward, we will make sure liaison happens with the community in the best way possible, with a portal for raising concerns and getting information.” Via Journalist Sally Heppleston

Full article below.

www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/south-east/save-the-bees-australia-founder-says-controversial-mosquit...

Or

leader.smedia.com.au/mornington-peninsula/
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

One way to help Save the bees is to learn about them. Pollinator Alliance has a great new Bee School based in Melbourne where you can learn more about bees and beekeeping. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

www.facebook.com/329133007190930/posts/2334308423340035?sfns=mo ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia shared a photo.
Save the Bees Australia

3 days ago

Instagram Photos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

www.facebook.com/329133007190930/posts/2329500957154115?sfns=mo ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Bees survive #bushfires. #beekeepers know the response of honeybees to smoke is to retreat and gorge on honey which tends to make them less inclined to sting, coupled with the masking of their alarm pheromone this is a godsend as it enables beekeepers to tend to their apiaries. This innate behaviour demonstrates bees have evolved through a fire-prone ecology.

The perception that honeybees can escape an approaching wildfire by gorging on honey than absconding in advance is an utter fallacy. Preparing to abscond or swarm takes planning, a laying queen is too heavy to fly and honey bees rarely abscond if brood is present. Thus for a swarm to depart from a hive takes preparation in advance – workers will stop feeding a queen before the anticipated swarm date and the queen will stop laying eggs. This is impossible with the sudden arrival of a fire.
After a devastating wildfire in the Table Mountain South Africa an analysis of the 17 natural nests within the fire zone supplied an explanation. Most colony's unexpectedly survived 68% had their openings entirely enclosed in propolis with small openings within this propolis wall serving as fire wall at entrances to the nest.
This is when the stored honey is essential to tide them over this dearth period which is about 2 to 3 weeks long before the fire-loving ephemerals sprout from underground bulbs or rhizomes and flower in profusion, having been relieved of competition from other plants.
The colonies are able to survive wild fires, another example of the incredible genius which exists in nature. //www.naturalbeekeepingtrust.org #savethebees #beethecure
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Www.change.org/banneonicotinoids ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

7 days ago

News Release

Wednesday 6 November 2019

All State forests closed between Sydney and Queensland border

All State forests from the north of Sydney to the Queensland border and the northern tablelands will be closed to the public on Thursday 7, Friday 8 and Saturday 9 November due to the very high to extreme fire danger over the coming days.

The closure applies to all State forests in the following Rural Fire Service zones:

• Greater Sydney Region

• Far North Coast

• North Coast

• Greater Hunter

New England

• Northern Slopes.

The only exceptions are Cumberland State Forest, Treetops Adventure Park at Ourimbah State

Forest and Sealy Lookout at Orara East State Forest.

Forestry Corporation of NSW's Senior Manager Forest Stewardship Kathy Lyons asked the community to stay out of these State forests due to the very high risk to public safety.

"We are expecting very high to severe and extreme fire weather over the next three days and there are already extensive fires across the north coast and tablelands. Fires are likely to be uncontrollable in these conditions," Ms Lyons said.

"All State forests from the north of Sydney to the Queensland border and the northern tablelands will be closed for the next three days due to the high fire danger.

"This closure will affect popular camp grounds and picnic areas throughout the region including

Olney, Heaton and Strickland State forests. Swans Crossing near Kendall, Coopernook Headquarters and recreation areas along the Allyn River and Telegherry River in the Chichester State forest.

"Please do not enter these forests over the next three days."

For the latest information about fires, visit the Rural Fire Service website www.rfs.nsw.gov.au

Media Contact: Elizabeth Fowler 0408 779 903 / Joanna Bodley 0427 939 543
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook