What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

We all share a common issue: no bees = no life. Save the Bees Australia aims to empower others to create change in their world. Bees and humanity face a major challenge from insecticides, herbicides, industrial-scale monoculture food farming and habitat fragmentation. Together we can tackle these issues and Save the Bees.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like-minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face. We are passionate advocates and educators who work with the community to change policy and personal action to support bee populations. Save the Bees Australia evolved from saving and rehousing problematic bee infestations to a social enterprise advocating for organic farming, nutrition, pollution, environment, education, wisdom, permaculture and love.

How you can Help

Donate

Your support allows us to keep Save the Bees Australia generating change. Please call us if you have any questions about your contribution. How do donations help?

Sign the Petition

Sign our petition to have imported honey labeled with country of origin. Help prevent corporations from confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products.

Personal Action

Learn how you can create a bee-friendly home and support bee-friendly practices.

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

Bees are at their most vulnerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming involves the oldest and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

5 hours ago

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia updated their profile picture.
Save the Bees Australia

1 day ago

Save the Bees Australia ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 day ago

To highlight the plight of indigenous bees
we have created a new Save the bees sticker championing the indigenous blue banded bee. (Amegilla )

Australia has over 2000 native bees the majority are solitary bees which means they live alone or in small families.

Unfortunately, Australian indigenous bees like the blue banded bee are experiencing health and population decline due to land clearing, bushfires and the use of toxic pesticides.

Unlike European Honeybees the government seems to do little to protect indigenous bees. Most indigenous bees don’t make honey and are solitary so they can’t be exploited on monoculture farms like honeybees are.

Blue banded bees nest in the soil or vegetation meaning their exposure to pesticide is greatly increased compared to bees that live in a hive.

Some indigenous bees like the blue banded bee are superior pollinators as they are able to utilise buzz pollination, a method that European Honeybees do not use. Some flowers hide their pollen inside tiny capsules. A Blue Banded Bee can grasp a flower of this type and shiver her flight muscles, causing the pollen to shoot out of the capsule. She can then collect the pollen for her nest and carry it from flower to flower, pollinating the flowers. Quite a few of our native Australian flowers require buzz pollination.

If you would like to support us and want a sticker please donate at least $5 to www.Beethecure.com
If you want more than 1 sticker just pay an extra $1 and let us know haw many you want.

You can pay via
www.paypal.com/paypalme/Beethecure


Or Bank transfer.


Beethecure
Bendigo Bank
BSB 633000
Acc 153832084

Than email us at hellobeethecure@gmail.com

Tell us how many stickers you have paid for and the name and address you want the stickers sent to.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Thanks for saving her @myempiricallife 🙏🐝🌻 ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Don’t let #mosquitoes ruin your holidays.

An all natural @EMBODYBEE Insect repellent.

www.embodybee.org/shop/browse-the-shop/insect-repellent-balm/

Safe for sensitive skin, Emily originally designed this balm when Olive was an infant and wanting to make something gentle and safe for the skin that actually worked.

This balm moisturises and soothes mozzie bites you already have as well as repells annoying bugs from getting to close. (A little goes a long way)

Ingredients-
.Olive oil
.Beeswax
.lavender
.Citronella

Comes in a 50gram white aluminium tin.

This is a 100% plastic free product, the sticker is compostable, made of paper printed with plant based inks and glue.

$1 from every tin sold goes to @Savethebeesaustralia

Purchase via @embodybee (website link is in her bio) #savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

Please create a safe platform for the bees to drink this can simply be done my adding pebbles or sticks to a bird bath.
Remember a beekeeper legally must give their bees access to water. 40 degrees tomorrow on the south coast of Australia. If bees have no water they can suffer even die. Bees like to feel safe while they are drinking . Bees find water in a number of places including damp rocks, branches, muddy puddles, pond edges, irrigation hoses. They swallow the water before flying home. The water is than transferred to bees waiting in-hive. The workers through the process of trophallaxis—transfer from one bee to another. Bees don’t store water, but bring it in as needed. In the heat of summer it is used for evaporative cooling. The water is spread in a thin film over sealed brood or on the rims of cells containing larvae and eggs. The in-hive workers then fan vigorously, setting up air currents which evaporate the water and cool the interior of the hive. The process is similar to the human-designed air conditioner.Nurse bees, who feed the developing larvae, also have a high demand for water. The nurses consume large amounts of pollen, nectar, and water so that their hypopharyngeal glands can produce the royal jelly that is used to feed the larvae and the queen. Bees seem to prefer water that has some growth in it—such as green slime that contains nutrients —rather than perfectly clean water. #savethebees photo @dreambr0ther
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

4 days ago

Amazing artwork for a local school. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

View on Facebook

1 week ago

A pesticide that kill bees has been authorised for use in England despite an EU-wide ban on its use outdoors two years ago and an explicit government pledge to keep the restrictions.

Monoculture farmers have successfully lobbied the government to allow the pesticide to be used which will kill billions of insects including the endangered bumblebee.

Conservationists have described the decision as regressive and called for safeguards to prevent the pollution of rivers with rainwater containing the chemical at a time when British insects are in serious decline.

This also will harm “birds and mammals eating seedlings from treated seed and birds consuming pelleted seed” and risked “adversely impacting populations of aquatic insects”.

The weight of evidence shows the risks neonicotinoids pose to our environment, particularly to the bees and other pollinators which play such a key part in our £100bn food industry, is greater than previously understood … We cannot afford to put our pollinator populations at risk.

In Australia there is no restrictions on the use of neonicotinoids and as a result billions of bees are being killed.

Please sign this petition.

Please sign and share this petition.
www.change.org/banneonicotinoids

www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/09/pesticide-believed-kill-bees-...
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals. 

Save

5 hours ago

View on Facebook
Save the Bees Australia updated their profile picture.
Save the Bees Australia

1 day ago

Save the Bees Australia ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 day ago

To highlight the plight of indigenous bees
we have created a new Save the bees sticker championing the indigenous blue banded bee. (Amegilla )

Australia has over 2000 native bees the majority are solitary bees which means they live alone or in small families.

Unfortunately, Australian indigenous bees like the blue banded bee are experiencing health and population decline due to land clearing, bushfires and the use of toxic pesticides.

Unlike European Honeybees the government seems to do little to protect indigenous bees. Most indigenous bees don’t make honey and are solitary so they can’t be exploited on monoculture farms like honeybees are.

Blue banded bees nest in the soil or vegetation meaning their exposure to pesticide is greatly increased compared to bees that live in a hive.

Some indigenous bees like the blue banded bee are superior pollinators as they are able to utilise buzz pollination, a method that European Honeybees do not use. Some flowers hide their pollen inside tiny capsules. A Blue Banded Bee can grasp a flower of this type and shiver her flight muscles, causing the pollen to shoot out of the capsule. She can then collect the pollen for her nest and carry it from flower to flower, pollinating the flowers. Quite a few of our native Australian flowers require buzz pollination.

If you would like to support us and want a sticker please donate at least $5 to www.Beethecure.com
If you want more than 1 sticker just pay an extra $1 and let us know haw many you want.

You can pay via
www.paypal.com/paypalme/Beethecure


Or Bank transfer.


Beethecure
Bendigo Bank
BSB 633000
Acc 153832084

Than email us at hellobeethecure@gmail.com

Tell us how many stickers you have paid for and the name and address you want the stickers sent to.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Thanks for saving her @myempiricallife 🙏🐝🌻 ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Don’t let #mosquitoes ruin your holidays.

An all natural @EMBODYBEE Insect repellent.

www.embodybee.org/shop/browse-the-shop/insect-repellent-balm/

Safe for sensitive skin, Emily originally designed this balm when Olive was an infant and wanting to make something gentle and safe for the skin that actually worked.

This balm moisturises and soothes mozzie bites you already have as well as repells annoying bugs from getting to close. (A little goes a long way)

Ingredients-
.Olive oil
.Beeswax
.lavender
.Citronella

Comes in a 50gram white aluminium tin.

This is a 100% plastic free product, the sticker is compostable, made of paper printed with plant based inks and glue.

$1 from every tin sold goes to @Savethebeesaustralia

Purchase via @embodybee (website link is in her bio) #savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

Please create a safe platform for the bees to drink this can simply be done my adding pebbles or sticks to a bird bath.
Remember a beekeeper legally must give their bees access to water. 40 degrees tomorrow on the south coast of Australia. If bees have no water they can suffer even die. Bees like to feel safe while they are drinking . Bees find water in a number of places including damp rocks, branches, muddy puddles, pond edges, irrigation hoses. They swallow the water before flying home. The water is than transferred to bees waiting in-hive. The workers through the process of trophallaxis—transfer from one bee to another. Bees don’t store water, but bring it in as needed. In the heat of summer it is used for evaporative cooling. The water is spread in a thin film over sealed brood or on the rims of cells containing larvae and eggs. The in-hive workers then fan vigorously, setting up air currents which evaporate the water and cool the interior of the hive. The process is similar to the human-designed air conditioner.Nurse bees, who feed the developing larvae, also have a high demand for water. The nurses consume large amounts of pollen, nectar, and water so that their hypopharyngeal glands can produce the royal jelly that is used to feed the larvae and the queen. Bees seem to prefer water that has some growth in it—such as green slime that contains nutrients —rather than perfectly clean water. #savethebees photo @dreambr0ther
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

4 days ago

Amazing artwork for a local school. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

1 week ago

View on Facebook

1 week ago

A pesticide that kill bees has been authorised for use in England despite an EU-wide ban on its use outdoors two years ago and an explicit government pledge to keep the restrictions.

Monoculture farmers have successfully lobbied the government to allow the pesticide to be used which will kill billions of insects including the endangered bumblebee.

Conservationists have described the decision as regressive and called for safeguards to prevent the pollution of rivers with rainwater containing the chemical at a time when British insects are in serious decline.

This also will harm “birds and mammals eating seedlings from treated seed and birds consuming pelleted seed” and risked “adversely impacting populations of aquatic insects”.

The weight of evidence shows the risks neonicotinoids pose to our environment, particularly to the bees and other pollinators which play such a key part in our £100bn food industry, is greater than previously understood … We cannot afford to put our pollinator populations at risk.

In Australia there is no restrictions on the use of neonicotinoids and as a result billions of bees are being killed.

Please sign this petition.

Please sign and share this petition.
www.change.org/banneonicotinoids

www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/09/pesticide-believed-kill-bees-...
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Mail Chimp

   

Subscribe, Join the Hive

* indicates required