What would happen if we had no bees?
Agriculture as we know it
would collapse
A world without apples, mangoes strawberries and pears.
Many animals would become extinct.
Put simply,
it would be a global disaster.
Help us bee the cure.

Our Story

All of us share this issue:  no bees = no life. I want to empower others to know they can make a difference. Products like “Round Up” weed killer and “Confidor” insecticides have been proven to harm bees. Glyphosate – the active ingredient in Round Up – has been banned in several countries for being carcinogenic.  Bees and humanity face a major challenge as massive corporations are determined to feed the world with GMO (genetically modified) Food mono culture farming.

What we Do

Save the Bees Australia has evolved from saving problem bee infestations and re housing bees into a social enterprise. Bees encompass so many issues organic farming , nutrition , pollution , environment , education, wisdom, permaculture and love.  Save the Bees Australia’s aim is to unite like minded people and raise awareness of the importance of bees and the plight that bees face.

How you can Help

Donate to Bee the Cure

Your support would mean a lot to us, If you have any questions please called us  0400 882 146. Donate Now

Sign the Petition

Corporations are confusing consumers by not adding country of origin on their imported honey products. Sign our petition to have imported honey labelled with country of origin.

 

Report a bee swarm

Do you have a swarm of bees that are bothering you?  Bees are at their most venerable and friendly when they swarm. Every bee in the hive knows the status of the hive’s health, production, and coherence. When the hive has ample honey and favourable weather conditions the colony will split to reproduce.  Swarming Involves older and wisest bees leaving their established location to scout out a new location. Swarm Patrol puts you in contact with beekeepers who will house and relocate the colony.

bee_no_background

“One can no more approach people without love than one can approach bees without care.  Such is the quality of bees…”
Leo Tolstoy

The Latest from Facebook

21 hours ago

In referring to the Restricted Activity Directions set out by the Chief Health Officer, which details business/activities that are restricted, beekeeping is not listed and therefore you are able to continue to operate, as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing rules (hand washing, etc., and keeping 1.5m away from others you may be working with). Additionally, this document also provides (at clause 13) that you may continue to operate for the purposes of treating/caring for animals and the maintenance of their facilities.

Also, in referring to the Stay At Home Directions (at clause 8) you are allowed to leave home for work (paid, voluntary or charitable), and do anything necessary to attend that work. That would include attending other properties where you may keep the bees (as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing). Much like a plumber/electrician/tradesperson is able to continue to operate and attend someone’s home to carry out a job, as a beekeeper you can also attend a (private) property if necessary in order to perform the activities of your work. The key is if you happen to be asked by authorities why you are on the road, it is necessary for you to perform the duties of your work and care for the welfare of the bees.

Furthermore, if you are needing freight or logistics to transport bees, please also note that the government has recognised this sector as essential to the Victorian community to transport goods to where they need to go, and as such if you need to transport bees you may continue to do so.

This is the current health advice and information available, which may be subject to change.

So yes you can, and good luck wintering down bee hives.

I hope this helps. If there is anything else I can assist with, please let me know – you may directly email Bridget.Vallence@parliament.vic.gov.au.



Kind regards

Bridget Vallence MP
State Member for Evelyn "
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21 hours ago

In referring to the Restricted Activity Directions set out by the Chief Health Officer, which details business/activities that are restricted, beekeeping is not listed and therefore you are able to continue to operate, as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing rules (hand washing, etc., and keeping 1.5m away from others you may be working with). Additionally, this document also provides (at clause 13) that you may continue to operate for the purposes of treating/caring for animals and the maintenance of their facilities.

Also, in referring to the Stay At Home Directions (at clause 😎 you are allowed to leave home for work (paid, voluntary or charitable), and do anything necessary to attend that work. That would include attending other properties where you may keep the bees (as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing). Much like a plumber/electrician/tradesperson is able to continue to operate and attend someone’s home to carry out a job, as a beekeeper you can also attend a (private) property if necessary in order to perform the activities of your work. The key is if you happen to be asked by authorities why you are on the road, it is necessary for you to perform the duties of your work and care for the welfare of the bees.

Furthermore, if you are needing freight or logistics to transport bees, please also note that the government has recognised this sector as essential to the Victorian community to transport goods to where they need to go, and as such if you need to transport bees you may continue to do so.

This is the current health advice and information available, which may be subject to change.

So yes you can, and good luck wintering down bee hives.

I hope this helps. If there is anything else I can assist with, please let me know – you may directly email Bridget.Vallence@parliament.vic.gov.au.

Take care, and all the best, Jim.



Kind regards

Bridget Vallence MP
State Member for Evelyn "
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2 days ago

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2 days ago

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has experienced its third mass bleaching event in five years. For the first time, all three sections of the reef have been severely affected.
The damage occurred in February when the reef was exposed to the hottest month of water temperatures on record.
Aerial surveys conducted by Terry Hughes at James Cook University in Australia and his colleagues during the last two weeks of March revealed that 25 per cent of the reef had been severely bleached and 35 per cent moderately bleached. The northern, central, and southern sections of the reef were all hit.

Read more: www.newscientist.com/article/2239957-the-great-barrier-reef-has-suffered-its-most-widespread-blea...

#everthingisconnected #savethebees
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3 days ago

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4 days ago

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4 days ago

Our Bee Presentation ... See MoreSee Less

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5 days ago

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5 days ago

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6 days ago

Seeds are abundant and free if you harvest your own. Nearly every plant you grow will produce hundreds if not thousands of seeds. When you let your plants flower and go to seeds your also feeding bees and other pollinators.
My favourite organic seed place The Diggers Club has is temporarily out of seeds and even Bunnings is restricting the sale of seeds.

The solution is so beautiful should we be sharing seeds?

In this clip Goldie shows us how to prepare next seasons Tomatoes by squeezing a slice of tomato onto paper towel and leaving it on the windowsill.

Goldie grows the most delicious tomatoes I haveI have ever tasted. I’ll definitely get some of his seeds.
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Contact us

For enquiries and more information please contact Simon Mulvany on 0400 882 146 or send us an email via our contact form.

Support Local honey producers and stockists

Australia’s whole honey industry is under threat from imported honey. The solution is for Australians to support local beekeepers and buy local. View our Honey Map and support the locals.

Honey Map

Save

 

21 hours ago

In referring to the Restricted Activity Directions set out by the Chief Health Officer, which details business/activities that are restricted, beekeeping is not listed and therefore you are able to continue to operate, as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing rules (hand washing, etc., and keeping 1.5m away from others you may be working with). Additionally, this document also provides (at clause 13) that you may continue to operate for the purposes of treating/caring for animals and the maintenance of their facilities.

Also, in referring to the Stay At Home Directions (at clause 8) you are allowed to leave home for work (paid, voluntary or charitable), and do anything necessary to attend that work. That would include attending other properties where you may keep the bees (as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing). Much like a plumber/electrician/tradesperson is able to continue to operate and attend someone’s home to carry out a job, as a beekeeper you can also attend a (private) property if necessary in order to perform the activities of your work. The key is if you happen to be asked by authorities why you are on the road, it is necessary for you to perform the duties of your work and care for the welfare of the bees.

Furthermore, if you are needing freight or logistics to transport bees, please also note that the government has recognised this sector as essential to the Victorian community to transport goods to where they need to go, and as such if you need to transport bees you may continue to do so.

This is the current health advice and information available, which may be subject to change.

So yes you can, and good luck wintering down bee hives.

I hope this helps. If there is anything else I can assist with, please let me know – you may directly email Bridget.Vallence@parliament.vic.gov.au.



Kind regards

Bridget Vallence MP
State Member for Evelyn "
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

21 hours ago

In referring to the Restricted Activity Directions set out by the Chief Health Officer, which details business/activities that are restricted, beekeeping is not listed and therefore you are able to continue to operate, as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing rules (hand washing, etc., and keeping 1.5m away from others you may be working with). Additionally, this document also provides (at clause 13) that you may continue to operate for the purposes of treating/caring for animals and the maintenance of their facilities.

Also, in referring to the Stay At Home Directions (at clause 😎 you are allowed to leave home for work (paid, voluntary or charitable), and do anything necessary to attend that work. That would include attending other properties where you may keep the bees (as long as you comply with hygiene and physical distancing). Much like a plumber/electrician/tradesperson is able to continue to operate and attend someone’s home to carry out a job, as a beekeeper you can also attend a (private) property if necessary in order to perform the activities of your work. The key is if you happen to be asked by authorities why you are on the road, it is necessary for you to perform the duties of your work and care for the welfare of the bees.

Furthermore, if you are needing freight or logistics to transport bees, please also note that the government has recognised this sector as essential to the Victorian community to transport goods to where they need to go, and as such if you need to transport bees you may continue to do so.

This is the current health advice and information available, which may be subject to change.

So yes you can, and good luck wintering down bee hives.

I hope this helps. If there is anything else I can assist with, please let me know – you may directly email Bridget.Vallence@parliament.vic.gov.au.

Take care, and all the best, Jim.



Kind regards

Bridget Vallence MP
State Member for Evelyn "
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Timeline Photos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

2 days ago

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has experienced its third mass bleaching event in five years. For the first time, all three sections of the reef have been severely affected.
The damage occurred in February when the reef was exposed to the hottest month of water temperatures on record.
Aerial surveys conducted by Terry Hughes at James Cook University in Australia and his colleagues during the last two weeks of March revealed that 25 per cent of the reef had been severely bleached and 35 per cent moderately bleached. The northern, central, and southern sections of the reef were all hit.

Read more: www.newscientist.com/article/2239957-the-great-barrier-reef-has-suffered-its-most-widespread-blea...

#everthingisconnected #savethebees
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

3 days ago

Timeline Photos ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

4 days ago

View on Facebook

4 days ago

Our Bee Presentation ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

View on Facebook

5 days ago

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Seeds are abundant and free if you harvest your own. Nearly every plant you grow will produce hundreds if not thousands of seeds. When you let your plants flower and go to seeds your also feeding bees and other pollinators.
My favourite organic seed place The Diggers Club has is temporarily out of seeds and even Bunnings is restricting the sale of seeds.

The solution is so beautiful should we be sharing seeds?

In this clip Goldie shows us how to prepare next seasons Tomatoes by squeezing a slice of tomato onto paper towel and leaving it on the windowsill.

Goldie grows the most delicious tomatoes I haveI have ever tasted. I’ll definitely get some of his seeds.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook